Lack of pharmacy staff meant some Kansas City CVS customers were unable to get their prescriptions

Some people in Kansas City were unable to get their prescriptions on Thursday. As the doors were open for business at the CVS Pharmacy on State Line Road and Blue Ridge Boulevard, customers were greeted by a sign that read “the pharmacy is temporarily closed due to staff shortages.” but they didn’t text me not to come,” customer Andrenna Jones said. Jones said she came for her son’s vaccine. “We showed up and waited. and the pharmacy is closed,” Jones said. Others said they couldn’t get prescriptions and learned of the issue after their doctor’s office closed.” There is no one there to call the other pharmacy to transfer it, so your doctor has to call, cancel it and send it somewhere else,” said customer Shannon Cambiano. The Missouri Pharmacy Association said the problem was part of a national trend. and then you add the pandemic to it,” said R on Fitzwater, CEO of the Missouri Pharmacy Association. The workers are exhausted. During historic inflation, insurance companies reduce reimbursements. “Often the PBM, the pharmacy benefits manager, earns more on the transaction than the pharmacist makes just for passing information from the pharmacist to the insurance company,” Fitzwater said. This means customers could see reduced store hours, or no pharmacist at all. The Missouri Pharmacy Association says it plans to take those questions to state lawmakers. He hopes lawmakers can help adjust refunds so consumers can get better service. provide life-saving vaccines. We have been successful in keeping our stores and pharmacies open to help support our customers, patients and communities and we are not experiencing any staffing issues in Kansas City.

Some people in Kansas City were unable to get their prescriptions on Thursday.

As the doors were open for business at the CVS Pharmacy on State Line Road and Blue Ridge Boulevard, customers were greeted by a sign that read “the pharmacy has been temporarily closed due to staff shortages.”

“I got a text to come introduce myself, but they didn’t text me not to come,” customer Andrenna Jones said.

Jones said she came for her son’s vaccine.

“We showed up and waited. We checked in online, got confirmation. We were able to check in, and the pharmacy is closed,” Jones said.

Others said they couldn’t get prescriptions and learned of the problem after their doctor’s office closed.

“There’s no one there to call the other pharmacy to transfer it, so your doctor has to call, cancel it, and send it somewhere else,” customer Shannon Cambiano said.

The Missouri Pharmacy Association said the problem was part of a national trend.

“It’s kind of a perfect storm in an environment where costs are rising dramatically, reimbursements are falling, and then you add the pandemic to it,” said Ron Fitzwater, CEO of the Missouri Pharmacy Association.

The workers are exhausted. In times of historic inflation, insurance companies cut reimbursements.

“Many times the PBM, the pharmacy benefits manager, earns more on the transaction than the pharmacist makes just for passing information from the pharmacist to the insurance company,” Fitzwater said.

This means customers could see reduced store hours, or no pharmacists at all.

The Missouri Pharmacy Association said it plans to take those questions to state lawmakers. He hopes lawmakers can help adjust refunds so consumers can get better service.

A CVS spokesperson released a statement Friday afternoon:

Our pharmacy teams have been on the front lines of the pandemic response for nearly three years, administering COVID-19 tests and providing lifesaving vaccines. We have been successful in keeping our stores and pharmacies open to help support our customers, patients and communities and we are not experiencing any staffing issues in Kansas City.

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