Trump forgave him. Now a Georgia man is suing the state, the insurer for half a million.

Duncan Fordham leaves the Augusta Federal Courthouse June 15, 2004 after being arraigned on charges of conspiracy to commit health care fraud. Credit: Chris Thelen/The Augusta Chronicle-USA TODAY NETWORK

Credit: The Augusta Chronicle-USA TODAY NETWORK

Credit: The Augusta Chronicle-USA TODAY NETWORK

Duncan Fordham leaves the Augusta Federal Courthouse June 15, 2004 after being arraigned on charges of conspiracy to commit health care fraud. Credit: Chris Thelen/The Augusta Chronicle-USA TODAY NETWORK

Credit: The Augusta Chronicle-USA TODAY NETWORK

Credit: The Augusta Chronicle-USA TODAY NETWORK

Three other people were also involved in the scheme, including former Atlanta Braves pitcher Rick Camp and lobbyist Chad Long, the grandson of former Georgia House chairman Tom Murphy, according to court documents.

In addition to the nearly $500,000 that was seized as a result of his conviction, Fordham continued to make monthly payments totaling $46,000 until Trump’s pardon, the complaint says.

He paid about $259,000 to the Georgia Department of Administrative Services, an agency that provides financial services to state and local government entities and a defendant in Fordham’s lawsuit. Fordham paid Great American Insurance Company, the other defendant in his lawsuit, $272,000 in restitution, records show.

Kalt said the presidential pardon absolved Fordham of his responsibility to continue paying restitution, but it seems unlikely that a federal court would agree that the pardon gives him the right to recover payments he had already made.

“It’s not clear, but it seems doubtful to me that he can get the money back,” Kalt said.

Fordham’s Augusta-based attorney John B. Long did not respond to a request for comment. The state Department of Administrative Services and the Great American Insurance Company also did not respond to requests for comment on the lawsuit.

Fordham was one of many people granted pardons in the final days of Trump’s presidency, many of whom were allies and loyalists of former president including Paul Manafort and Roger J. Stone Jr.

The frantic rhythm of graces even created a lucrative cottage industry which has enriched those in Trump’s entourage who listened to him. Long wrote a letter to Trump weeks after the 2020 election, asking for a pardon and arguing that his client should never have been charged, according to court records.

“Mr. Fordham has been punished more than enough,” the letter reads.

Fordham isn’t the only person with Georgia ties to be pardoned by Trump during his presidency. In 2020, he pardoned Atlanta-based reality TV star and congressional candidate Angela Stanton-King, a vocal and outspoken supporter of the former president. Stanton-King had been convicted of federal conspiracy for her role in a car theft ring in 2004.

Trump said in recent comments that if he stands for re-election and wins, he will “very, very seriously” consider full pardons for the hundreds of people who have been indicted for their involvement in the 6 January at the United States Capitol.

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